www.YourGameroom.com
www.GameRoomAntiques.com
Home . . . About Us . . . . Site Index
Secure Order Form

Price Guides

Repair Manuals
Classified Ads
Juke Boxes
Slot Machines
Pinball Machines
Trade Stimulators
Gum Machines
Arcade Items
Soda Machines
CD Jukebox
Free Newsletter
Music Boxes
Neon Clocks
Punchboards
Character Slots
Vending
Penny Drops
Stamp Machines
Mutoscopes
Video Games
Mechanical &
Still Banks
Coin-Op
Posters

Kiddie Rides

Gambling Books

Out of Print
Back Issues
Coin Op
CD Rom

Clearance Items

45rpm Records
78rpm Records
Compact Discs
Diner Furniture
News Stories

Reference Books

Slot/Juke
Gazette
Feature Stories
Shows & Auctions
Restoration
Schematics
Sales Lists
Help Service
Jukebox
Service Manuals

Slot Books

Pinball Books

Gumball Books

Jukebox Books

Cat Collectibles
Classified Ads
Juke Boxes
Slot Machines
Pinball Machines
Trade Stimulators
Gum Machines
Arcade Items
Soda Machines
CD Jukebox
Free Newsletter
Ad Rates

www.GameRoomAntiques.com

METAL
STAMPING
MACHINES


One of the most popular type of arcade machines were those that gave you something for your money. Card vendors and fortunetellers are good examples of these machines. Every arcade also had to have a metal stamping machine.

The early stamping machines stamped the letters on a metal strip. The stamper was in an oak wood case and on top of a metal pedestal. One of the earliest was the 1901 Roovers Stamper Machines. See Photo

Later models were in more attractive cases and stamped the letters on a round aluminum disk. Each metal disk could be stamped with up to 32 letters for just 5(. Many people would use them as identification tags and attach them to their key chains, luggage, golf bags, dog collars, etc. Others used them to write out love messages to their dates.

The Groetchen Metal Stamper, sat in a solid walnut cabinet, with metal front and steel bottom. The case was finished in hammerloid enamel and chromium. The machine contains six tubes of over 1150 metal disks, thereby permitting sales of $57.50 before the machine had to be refilled.

The player would select the letters, one at a time, pulling down the handle after each selection. An indicator dial shows how many letters have already been stamped and how many more to go.

The machine weighed 152 pounds, was 60" high, and took only 18" x 18" floor space. The metal stamping machines were so sturdy that many of them are still being operated today. The aluminum disks are still available to arcade operators.

.

Copyright: 2006 Ken Durham.


.

.

SITE INDEX:

.


Go back to
Sales Lists, Wanted Lists and Trade Lists menu.
Go back to GameRoomAntiques

For more information on: Who We Are & Our Privacy Policy

Ken Durham
GameRoomAntiques
3000 Galloway Ridge, C-306
Pittsboro NC 27312
For Orders Only: 202-213-1585
All others, please email: durham@GameRoomAntiques.com

http://www.GameRoomAntiques.com